The Pilates Half Roll Back with a flexband helps to promote the opening of the Lumbar Spine in flexion and the activation of core musculature.

Chronic back pain is often caused by posture that is the result of weak abdominal strength which leads to an anterior tilted pelvis and arched low back.

If you sit most of the day, have tight hip flexors or just had a baby, this exercise below is very helpful to counter this postural effect.

Turn up the sound and try it out. Comment below and tell me what you think!

Realign. Strengthen. Live your Life.


The season of spring not only wakes up hibernating animals from their slumber, but hibernating athletes as well.  The rise in temperature brings out more people being physically active outdoors.  This is a wonderful thing, but please take this word of advice:  Although your mind may feel that your body is as fit as it was in its “Heyday”, it may not be.  If you haven’t been consistent with your training, the reality is that your muscles atrophy (shrink) and your flexibility reduces.  The same thing applies to your cardio. Your heart is a muscle and if you don’t do endurance training regularly, your ability to exercise for longer periods of time will reduce.

In a nutshell, take the following steps so that your Spring enthusiasm doesn’t lead you to injury:

  1. Be realistic with your goals. If you ran 10K regularly in November, you may not be able to do that today.  Find a training book that will give you a program to gradually increase your mileage safely.
  2. Mind your posture. Your back, abdominals and gluts stabilize your spine and pelvis and maintain proper alignment in any activity.  If these muscles are not well conditioned, you can develop injuries such as low back pain, I-T band syndrome, etc.
  3. Cross Train. Your body adapts to the stimuli that you give it.  If you sit most of the year, your body has adapted to this and will not be able to handle a new burst of activity.   Engage in full body resistance training, dance, pilates/yoga and cardio to give yourself a strong and leaner body.
  4. Get new shoes. Those kicks from the ’80s are not going to cut it.  Find a good shoe that provides cushioning and support and that is SPORT SPECIFIC to your activity.
  5. Enjoy! Don’t be too hard on yourself if your body doesn’t seem to be as strong as it was before.  Realize that the body adapts and will improve with consistent training.  Enjoy the wind and sun on your face as you play outdoors!  Re-awaken your senses.

Dr. Blessyl Buan, DC

If you feel like you never have energy to go work out, then ask yourself what time of the day you have the most energy.

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Fitness for breakfast (roll out of bed and jump into your running shoes)

If you are morning person like myself, then going for a quick run or resistance training before a big breakfast is a great way to start the day. Not only that, you’ve already ticked off fitness off your list, so you no longer have to deal with the guilt when you get home from a busy day.

Fitness for lunch

If you have a long commute to work or school, morning workouts will cut into your sleep time! So the lunch hour is a great time to squeeze in some physical activity. Pop into your local gym for a class, take a nice walk or run around the block! You can probably eat your lunch at your desk afterwards…

Fitness for dessert

If you have more energy in the late afternoon or evening, working out is a great way to blow off some steam from work, school or taking care of the house or kids.

Once you find out your prime time for activity, you can get rid of the excuses!

Start moving!

http://www.drblessyl.com

running-outside-with-waterbottle1

It’s easy to believe that you can continue at the same pace and intensity from where you left off last spring when you haven’t trained all winter. The weather is warmer and you may have registered for some races to motivated you.  Here are some tips to keep your goals realistic and increase activity in a healthy way.

1. Are your shoes still good?

Even if they look good they may have run it’s course (no pun intended).  Running/walking shoes should have a cushiony and supportive upper (ball of the foot part of the shoe). There should be some resistance when you bend your shoe in half from the sole.  If you can do this too easily, then you need new shoes! The more mileage you have, the more often you need to replace them. Even if you are a minimalist runner, meaning you are anti-cushioning, running footwear must still be up to date.  This will not deter your ability to feel the road.

2. Be realistic. 

If you’re a bit rusty, be honest with yourself and don’t pick up from where you left off last spring. Increase your level of intensity in a gradual way. There are many apps and resources that can help you with a running training program.  When you use an objective method to increase your running distance, injuries can be prevented. If you signed up for the Toronto Nike 15K run in June, Nike has great information here: http://content.nike.com/content/dam/one-nike/en_us/running/nwes-toronto-15k/training-program.pdf The information integrates information on how to safely increase your running distance and incorporate cross training.

3. Cross Train

Strength conditioning of your core muscles like transverse abdominus, obliques, glut medius and pelvic floor will help prevent IT Band issues, low back and knee pain that often develop from an unstable lumbar and pelvis. Remember, distance running is about endurance not power, so make sure that your muscles are ready for the distance.  Overall resistance training of upper and lower body will also improve performance.

4. Stretch it out

Working out new muscles will cause muscle soreness as your body adapts to your new activity. Stretching will reduce muscle stiffness and pain. Keeping the fascia mobile will help to prevent injury and improve motion. Also, don’t just focus on your legs.   A loose jaw, neck, chest and hand help to ensure that breathing is effortless during your runs.

5. Begin!  A body that hasn’t run in a while will think of many excuses. Just get started and remember you run for the joy.  Enjoy being outside.  Running is fun.

If you need help with your alignment. I am happy to get your body back into shape.  A body that is aligned can absorb shock better and injuries can be prevented.  Chiropractic, acupuncture, myofascial release and kinesiotape are all tools to keep you moving. Email info@dblessyl.com for more information.

Realign. Strengthen. Live your Life.

runner-stretchDid you know that your muscles adapt to the level of activity that you do? The heavier you lift, the bigger your muscles become.  Likewise, the more you stretch the longer your muscles become.

For example, when you sit for most of the day, your hip flexor muscles shorten. You may think that this is not be a big deal , but when you want to start to become physically active, you become more prone to injury because your body is not used to being lengthened, especially if the range of motion is ballistic (quick spurts).

To prevent injury, stretch once a day and hold the stretch for at least 30 seconds. 

 

 

Ask Dr. Blessyl

ITB SYNDROME

 

Do you ever get a dull pain on the outside of your knee after running for approximately two kilometers? Chances are you may have I-T Band Syndrome. 

 

The Iliotibial band is a connective tissue that attaches from your illiac crest to your knee.  When this band becomes tight it tugs on the knee causing pain. 

 it-band

Causes:

The cause of IT-Band syndrome is multifactorial.  Here are some of the potential causative factors:

  • A sudden increase in running distance
  • Running with old running shoes or shoes without the proper support
  • Starting hill training
  • Feet that over-pronate (roll-in) or over supinate (roll out)
  • Weak core musculature most especially gluteus medius
  • Treatment:
  • Ice the area that feels painful.
  • Stretch the IT-Band after your run or workout
  • Strengthen your core musculature
  • If the pain is too intense while running. Remove running from your training schedule until you heal.
  • See your health care provider to treat your symptoms. 

 

Safe Running Tips


On Sunday May 6th, Dr. Blessyl runs her first 10K race at the Sporting Life 10K Run.

 Here are some safe running tips:

  • During hot weather, run in the early morning or evening, to avoid heat exhaustion. Do not run when pollution levels are high.
  • Keep yourself hydrated (carry water with you and drink water after your run)
  • Carry a cell-phone with you in case you experience a medical emergency and let others know your running route.
  • Whenever possible, run on a clear, smooth, resilient, even, and reasonably soft surface. Avoid running on hills, which increases stress on the ankle and foot. When running on curved surfaces, change directions in forward movement, so that you have even pressure on both feet during the run.
  • Wear sunblock to avoid sunburn. UV rays still penetrate on a cloudy day.

Source: U.S.A. Track and Field Association, Road Runners Club of America and American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine