The Pilates Half Roll Back with a flexband helps to promote the opening of the Lumbar Spine in flexion and the activation of core musculature.

Chronic back pain is often caused by posture that is the result of weak abdominal strength which leads to an anterior tilted pelvis and arched low back.

If you sit most of the day, have tight hip flexors or just had a baby, this exercise below is very helpful to counter this postural effect.

Turn up the sound and try it out. Comment below and tell me what you think!

Realign. Strengthen. Live your Life.


Want to learn something interesting? I’ve treated talented riders with postural issues resulting in low back pain. What I noticed however, is that ALL of my low back and stressed out patients are trying so desperately to stay on their “horse”.That’s right. It’s invisible.

In an attempt to stabilize our body because of weak #abdominals and a weak mid back, we grip and strain our muscles in our neck, pecs, arms and hands to hold on the reins. We overuse our deep hip flexors called the #psoad, our deep hip rotators of the hip and our adductors in our inner thighs to squeeze the body of the horse.
This is an unhealthy strategy and it’s also an emotional one. As a consequence we throw ourselves into #chronic misalignment and this will manifest as chronic headaches, TMJ pain, neck pain, thoracic outlet syndrome, snapping hip, low back pain, shallow breathing, rib joint dysfunction, sciatica, hip pain and generalized stiffness.
For this reason, I myofascially release these muscles with my hands or acupuncture, realign the joints with chiropractic adjustments and teach the body to maintain alignment with Kinesiotape and Pilates.
It’s a commitment. Have the right team on your side to get you healthy. Realign. Strengthen. Live your Life. 20141208-074403-27843564.jpg

Step one: Stop cheating in your alignment

The iliopsoas muscle is the deep hip flexor muscle that attaches to your low back (lumbar spine) and deep into your hip (femoral head). This muscle gets tight from overuse from sitting and physical activity. When this tight is chronically tight, your abdominal muscles are unable to stabilize your spine for posture and you can potentially develop chronic low back pain, hip pain and even pain or numbness and tingling down your leg! Tight psoas muscles are a common issue that I treat in my office.

I would argue that most people don’t know how to isolate this muscle to stretch it. Watch this video to learn my simple and easy tip to relieve strain and tension.

If you found this video useful, you can find more tips on my twitter/instagram @drblessyl and Facebook!

Realign. Strengthen. Live your Life.
http://www.drblessyl.com

I’m 7 months pregnant today with my third child. Well, I don’t like to slow down, but this baby is making me walk slower, lift lighter and less mentally alert. But my schedule presses forward. I Kinesio Tape my abs for strength and stability, I work out as much as I can and I eat well and take my supplements to ensure I can keep up with my family and career.

I’m slowing down.

I have five more weeks until I go on maternity leave.

It takes me longer to walk around. My husband walks three metres ahead of me.

I’m slowing down.

My two-year old and my four-year old daughters still want me to carry them. I do.

I throw my back out.

I’m a chiropractor, dancer and pilates instructor. This doesn’t happen to me.

But it does….and it will…. because I am pregnant.

“It’s okay,” I tell myself. “This is normal right?”

Yes!

So please, give a pregnant woman a seat on the bus or subway. Her face may look young, but she’s tired after a long day.

It’s all for the greater good, for this life that grows inside me. I anticipate the addition to my family. I’m tired, but I am not lazy. I am still “working” as I sit to nurture the child that will be born in April.

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The season of spring not only wakes up hibernating animals from their slumber, but hibernating athletes as well.  The rise in temperature brings out more people being physically active outdoors.  This is a wonderful thing, but please take this word of advice:  Although your mind may feel that your body is as fit as it was in its “Heyday”, it may not be.  If you haven’t been consistent with your training, the reality is that your muscles atrophy (shrink) and your flexibility reduces.  The same thing applies to your cardio. Your heart is a muscle and if you don’t do endurance training regularly, your ability to exercise for longer periods of time will reduce.

In a nutshell, take the following steps so that your Spring enthusiasm doesn’t lead you to injury:

  1. Be realistic with your goals. If you ran 10K regularly in November, you may not be able to do that today.  Find a training book that will give you a program to gradually increase your mileage safely.
  2. Mind your posture. Your back, abdominals and gluts stabilize your spine and pelvis and maintain proper alignment in any activity.  If these muscles are not well conditioned, you can develop injuries such as low back pain, I-T band syndrome, etc.
  3. Cross Train. Your body adapts to the stimuli that you give it.  If you sit most of the year, your body has adapted to this and will not be able to handle a new burst of activity.   Engage in full body resistance training, dance, pilates/yoga and cardio to give yourself a strong and leaner body.
  4. Get new shoes. Those kicks from the ’80s are not going to cut it.  Find a good shoe that provides cushioning and support and that is SPORT SPECIFIC to your activity.
  5. Enjoy! Don’t be too hard on yourself if your body doesn’t seem to be as strong as it was before.  Realize that the body adapts and will improve with consistent training.  Enjoy the wind and sun on your face as you play outdoors!  Re-awaken your senses.